Might TMJ Cause Your Teeth to Change Place Over Time?

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ)  is one of the most important structures within your face. As it enables your jaw to function properly, it plays a key role in chewing and even breathing. 

However, many individuals suffer from a condition known as TMJ disorder. Some of the most common symptoms include pain or stiffness in the jaw, inexplicable headaches and a “clicking” sensation when chewing. 

If you have this condition, might your teeth also be at risk of shifting over time? Let us take a closer look at this understandable concern in order to better appreciate when the opinion of a specialist is required. 

Is There a Link with Bruxism?

Those who grind their teeth will frequently be diagnosed with a condition known as bruxism. The main question is whether or not there is a definitive link between bruxism and TMJ. This is a rather complex issue, as some with bruxism can develop TMJ over time — while in other situations, TMJ could very well lead to bruxism. 

It is nonetheless a fact that either of these situations will place an undue amount of pressure upon your teeth. As a result, they are more likely to shift if the underlying conditions are not treated with a proactive approach. 

Determining the Root Causes of Your Symptoms

One of the first steps is to discover what actually may be caused your TMJ. This is normally quite an easy task with the help of a dentist or oral care specialist. They will closely examine the structure of your jaw as well as the mechanics of your bite. 

They may also take other related factors into account such as:

  • The anatomy of your skull and jaw
  • Arthritis
  • Stress in your life

During this session, it is also likely the dentist will take a closer look at your teeth in order to determine if you might be concurrently suffering from bruxism. Assuming that the underlying factors are found, there will normally be a host of excellent treatment options. 

Are you suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above? If so, it’s important to get treatment to improve your dental health — and your quality of life. You will then be able to treat a minor issue before it becomes a major problem that requires more in-depth medical intervention.