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All-on-Four an Alternative to Dentures

Dentures are often recommended as the treatment of choice to people who are missing several teeth. They have several advantages over other dental treatments like traditional implants, which require more time consuming and invasive work and are more expensive. 

However, a system is available that combines dentures and dental implants. It can be more affordable and convenient — all-on-four implants.

Benefits of All-on-Fours

As their name suggests, this treatment involves the use a limited number of implants (usually 4 or 6) to replace missing teeth. All-on-four implants are evenly distributed along the dental arch — and because the implants are securely inserted into the jawbone, the dentures are held securely in place.

This system has several benefits over traditional dentures. First of all, with the implants acting as stabilisers, the dentures stay in place — so there is no need to fiddle with adhesive or get the right gum suction. 

Because the dentures are securely attached to the jaw bone, you can eat, chew, and speak normally without having to worry about a denture coming loose.

Another benefit is that these implants are a permanent solution and will last a lifetime if you care for them as instructed by your dentist. This also means that in the long run, implants are much more cost-effective than simply having dentures, which need to be replaced every few years.

Keeps You Looking Younger Longer

Not only that, but all-on-four implants can make a dramatic difference in how your face looks. Tooth loss causes jaw bone reduction, since missing tooth roots can no longer stimulate the bone. Over time, this can make your cheeks look sunken and make you look older than you really are. 

Wearing a denture can help counter the jaw bone loss process, but only to a certain extent. All-on-fours are much more effective at stimulating the jaw bone and giving your face a fuller and more youthful look.

You’ll Have Your Ideal Smile Quickly, Effectively

Lastly, these implants can be fitted without undergoing bone graft surgery, which is sometimes needed if a patient does not have enough bone left in their jaw. As a result, this treatment eliminates the need for invasive dental work and helps you achieve your ideal smile faster, as it skips a stage that is often very time consuming.

Moreover, this treatment can be done on both upper and lower arches and is highly effective, as its success rates are in the region of 99.8%. With these implants, you can be confident that you will achieve an attractive smile and regenerate jaw bone with almost no risk of failure or complications.

How TMJ Dentistry Can Help Your Teeth Grinding

Teeth grinding or clenching can have a serious impact on oral health if left untreated. Also known as bruxism, it can lead to a wearing down of teeth, broken fillings and increased tooth sensitivity. 

Although people can experience teeth grinding during the day, many will find their teeth grinding occurs overnight while they sleep. This can result in awaking with jaw pain, headaches or earaches. The longer teeth grinding remains unaddressed the more severe the potential impact on the jaw and teeth.

The temporomandibular joints (TMJ) connect the jaw to the skull, acting as hinges which allow the movement in the jaw so you can talk, chew and yawn. A TMJ disorder is one of the main causes of teeth grinding and results from problems with the muscles around the jaw or from the jaw itself. A dentist can recognise the symptoms of teeth grinding and if they suspect a TMJ disorder could be a cause they can refer you to a specialist TMJ dentist.

TMJ dentistry can help to reduce any pain and discomfort from a TMJ disorder while also recommending treatment options to prevent future teeth grinding. By tackling bruxism, TMJ dentistry helps to also prevent future oral health problems associated with teeth grinding and clenching. One of the more common ways to address teeth grinding is with a custom-made mouthguard, which reduces bruxism by preventing the top and bottom rows of teeth coming together.

A TMJ dentist will evaluate the symptoms of each individual to advise on the most suitable treatment for teeth grinding or clenching. Using a splint is an alternative to a mouthguard and depending on the individual case the splint could be fitted to either the top or bottom row of teeth. The splint is designed to gently ease the jaw in to a more relaxed position and most users will find this helps to alleviate any pain while also reducing their bruxism.

As well as pain and trouble chewing, symptoms of a TMJ disorder can also include swelling and a popping sound in the jaw when opening the mouth. 

Teeth grinding can also be due to stress and anxiety, so lifestyle changes or modifications to limit stress may be recommended alongside a mouthguard or splint to reduce bruxism. 

Teeth grinding can also have an adverse effect on sleep, so by addressing bruxism and TMJ disorders you can look forward to better nights of important restorative sleep.

Unexpected Symptoms of TMJ Disorder

We have two Temporomandibular joints (TMJ) which are located on either side of the jaw and connect the jawbone to the skull. They act as a hinge allowing you to chew, speak and yawn. However, for those who have misaligned teeth, an improper bite or arthritis, disorders of these joints can lead to further issues. 

Symptoms of TMJ disorders include pain, popping noises within the jaw and being unable to open the mouth. However, a few more symptoms of TMJ disorder are less known.

Ear troubles

The proximity of the TMJ to the ears mean disorders of these joints can result in ear ache and ear infections. Some people experience tinnitus or a feeling of fullness within the ear. Dizziness is also another possible symptom of TMJ. This is due to inflammation in the muscles and connecting tissue supporting the jaw which may affect the inner ear.

Vision issues

The temporomandibular joints are also located close to the trigeminal nerve. This nerve is linked to your vision and therefore any inflammation from a TMJ disorder can result in vision issues in one or both eyes. This can include a feeling of pressure behind the eyes, blurred or tired eyes and sensitivity to light. 

Though not a common issue, a pinched trigeminal nerve from inflammation can also lead to tingling and numbness in the legs and arms, or possibly limbs which ache or feel weak. 

Head and neck pain

TMJ disorders can also affect your neck, shoulders and upper back. This can be caused through the increased muscle tension induced by the disorder. This may be compounded by your posture as you try to find a way to reduce any jaw pain or discomfort resulting from TMJ disorders. You may not realise it, but you could be holding your head and neck in a position which is not a natural one. So in attempting to alleviate one source of discomfort you could be creating another.

The important point to remember is TMJ disorders are treatable. By booking an appointment with your dentist if you think you have symptoms of a TMJ disorder you can have the cause of the disorder evaluated and a treatment plan recommended. Pain from TMJ disorders is largely temporary providing you seek the advice of an experienced professional dentist.

What Causes My Child’s Cavities When They Are Brushing Regularly?

There are many factors which can cause cavities even with regular teeth brushing, among them inadequate oral hygiene. Regular appointments with a dentist can help prevent your child having cavities.

Key takeaways:

  • Children often miss cleaning hard-to-reach areas of the mouth where the food which bacteria feeds on can be trapped.
  • Frequently eating food increases the risk of more bacteria as it feeds off the sugar from the food breaking down.
  • Regularly drinking water can help clear the mouth of food debris and neutralise acid produced by bacteria.

“Bacteria feed on food that breaks down into sugar. Any carbohydrate breaks down into a form of sugar which is a treat to bacteria. Bacteria feed on these sugars, produce acid that soften the tooth and gradually forms a cavity.”

Read the full story here : https://www.drmichaels.com/blog/why-does-my-child-have-cavities-despite-regular-brushing

A Look at Laser Periodontal Therapy

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Were you aware that lasers are having a massive impact upon oral care treatments?

This is especially true in treating severe gum disease, called periodontal disease. This condition is caused by factors such as smoking, poor oral hygiene, failing to brush your teeth correctly, not consulting with a dentist on a regular basis, and certain types of medication.

Laser therapies are now beginning to replace traditional methods such as planing and scaling. Lasers will burn away any affected gum tissue before accessing the root. Not only is this method more efficient and precise, but the patient will not experience any pain. In other words, you will not require any type of anaesthetic.

While there are certain risks associated with any type of dental treatment, lasers tend to be safe options. The only possible concern is if a dentist utilises the inappropriate wavelength of light. This could result in the removal of more tissue than is necessary.

However, the chances of this occurring are relatively slim if you consult with a trained technician. To put this another way, such a risk is much less of a concern when compared with traditional techniques that are associated with a fair amount of mechanical manipulation of the gums.

Insurance Coverage and Future Care

The good news about laser therapy is that the majority of providers will offer coverage, as the technique is intended to correct any important medical condition. After-care instructions are similar to those following any type of dental treatment.

Always practice the proper cleaning techniques. Do not smoke as that is known to irritate the gums. Finally, be sure to see your dentist in a timely fashion in order to identity any minor issues before the turn into large problems.

Key takeaways:

– As lasers are less invasive, issues such as excess bleeding and swelling are virtually eliminated.

– You will not experience any pain and will recover in a much shorter time frame.

– It is easy for the dentist to access areas of the tooth that need to be planed.

“In periodontal laser therapy, the provider uses a dental laser to access and remove the inflamed gum tissue from around the root of the tooth.”

Publication title: “How Laser Periodontal Therapy Treats Gums Disease”

Bad Habits You Can Change to Improve Your Smile

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Breaking bad habits can help improve the health of your teeth and gums. With improved oral health you can gain more confidence in your smile.

Key takeaways:

-Twice daily teeth brushing and regular cleaning from your dentist helps prevent plaque which can cause cavities.

-Change from snacks such as chips and pretzels, or sugary drinks like pop, to healthier options.

-Take care not to use your teeth to open packages to avoid unnecessary wear and tear.

“Similarly, sucking on sugar candies or mints, and thick chewy candies like toffees are also a big risk for the teeth.”

Read the full story here https://healthable.org/fix-these-bad-habits-to-improve-your-smile/

The Link Between Poor Oral Health and Optimal Health

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Good oral health may have more benefits than just the well-being of your teeth and gums. Poor oral health could be a sign of a more serious underlying health condition.

Key takeaways:

– Poor oral health may increase the risk of heart disease.

– Issues with your teeth and gums may indicate serious health issues such as diabetes and HIV.

– Oral health should be a priority and include regular professional teeth cleaning.

“Professional teeth cleaning removes plaque and tartar build-up that daily brushing does not cover.”

Read the full story here https://healthyone.org/the-connection-between-oral-health-and-optimal-health/

Handling Teeth Grinding In Your Child

teeth, health , smile, dentist

If your child wakes up with headaches, see the dentist immediately. This may be a sign of teeth Grinding (bruxism) which is a common habit that causes enamel erosion, cracking and gum inflammation. Here’s more.

Key points:

– Confirm if your child is stressed and seek stress-relieving remedies.

– Prevent anxiety and hyperactivity especially in children with ADHD and ADD.

– Have your child wear a mouthguard to sleep in order to protect teeth.

– Visit the dentist to assess any underlying dental problems like misaligned bites.

Watch out for signs like cracks and jaw pain. Also, see the dentist regularly for checkups and treatment.

Read more here:

https://yourdentalhealthresource.com/how-to-prevent-and-treat-your-childs-teeth-grinding/

 

Bad Breath: Causes and Cures

teeth, health , smile, dentist

Unless bad breath is caused by gum disease or an underlying medical condition, the problem is usually easy to avoid or treat. The most common causes are either improper dental care or eating the wrong foods. Smoking is also a recognised culprit.

Avoiding bad breath can be achieved by following some basic guidelines:

– Take proper care of teeth and gums and visit the dentist regularly

– Avoid “smelly” foods like onions, garlic and strongly flavoured snacks

– Use a good anti-bacterial mouthwash

Rinsing the mouth regularly with water also helps as “trapped food also adds to the problem” and allows bacteria to accumulate on the teeth and gums. Read more about avoiding bad breath at https://www.modernghana.com/news/895255/bad-breath-and-what-to-do.html

 

Did You Know the Menopause Can Affect Your Teeth?

teeth, health , smile, dentist

The change in estrogen levels seen in the menopause can have a detrimental impact on your teeth:

– The menopause can cause dry mouth, worsened gum disease and potential tooth loss due to osteoporosis of the jaw bone (all a result of lower estrogen levels).

– Good oral care is vital during the menopause to maintain a healthy smile.

– Make an appointment with your dentist to discuss any concerns about your oral health during the menopause.

“You might be surprised to know that your teeth and gums may experience some changes with the onset of menopause.”

Read the full story here: https://yourdentalhealthresource.com/can-menopause-impact-dental-health/